Friday, June 15, 2012

Longest Roof Sheet in the World!

World's Longest Roof Sheet?

Is this the worlds longest roof sheet - at the sales yards at Carcoar in Australia! Maybe it should be in the Guinness Book of Records!

See the article at Shedeye "Giant Cattle Shed".
It states in the article (with a link to CTLX) the following:

Carcoar Sale Yard - Aramax - the worlds longest roof sheets?
The cattle pavilion roof sheets are believed to be the longest single length sheets manufactured and erected anywhere in the world.
This is a photo of the worlds largest copper roof - at Copper Development Association!

Worlds largest Copper Roof?

I think this may be a record for the worlds longest roof sheets - and by Aramax! Can't find out the length - but assume it's over 150 meters - and any other info on the worlds longest roof sheet - please comment!

13 comments:

  1. SILENTWITNESS Wednesday, May 23, 2012

    http://www.ctlx.com.au/facilities.html
    this article details that when the Aramax machine was owned by Brice Engineers that they rolled sheets on a cattle pavilion which were 144m long....
    tinman is expansion an issue with the product? i know they crane the rollformer onto the roof but even then 122 or 144m lengths would be interesting to handle even on a calm day.
    Reply

    Roofer i posted this awhile back... the sheet lengths were 144m - shed eye must have read the article and ran with it.
    Now Aramax apparently can achieve this with special plates and washers which allow for expansion - i personally see this as a weak point of the design. Long run roofing is subject to such expansion - this would be a pain to keep waterproof. Onsite rolling for concealed fix decking also has the same issue. Step joints are the common practice to avoid these issues and also make for easier to handle roof sheeting.
    I was surprised that the joint clip from stramit hasn't had a greater impact in this regard. OHS concerns will soon render onsite rolling too much of a risk and longer length sheeting may become a thing of the past, i expect to see more step joint roofs or broken runs (either with clips or change of pitch)as they are easier to flash and handle onsite.
    I have seen a few roofs where expansion has played a huge part in subsequent roof failures and leaks.

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  2. SW - I agree - the article probably originated from your comment - and also the joint clip from Stramit is one solution! The cost factor is one thing to consider - is is cheaper to run long sheets or do the alternative (step joints or broken runs) when you have to have the cranes etc on site/

    I would love to visit the CTLX yards and see if they have leakage problems!

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  3. i would love to see it too - i have yet to come across a job in Aramax i can get close to. It would be interesting to see the clear arrangement as to how the sheet fits into/on it and what effect its location has on its water carrying capacity before failure.

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  4. Assuming a thermal expansion of around 1mm per meter ... That gives some serious clip and fixing problems, I know Kalzip have done over 150m , would like to know how they handle 300mm of expansion?

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  5. I can see both you and SW's point in this - especially with the expansion amounts involved!
    As their data fixing details shows and states:
    "311x100x10mm PLATE CLEAT
    6mm E48 GP CFW TO RAFTER
    2/M12 GALVANISED BOLTS WITH
    50x16mm SLOTTED HOLES
    50x50x3mm GALVANISED STEEL AND
    38mm DIAMETER 1mm THICK HDPE WASHERS"

    So the only expansion is the 50mm slot in the cleat? They must change this to accomodate the longer lengths - but how do you retain the integrity of a 150mm long slot at each end??

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  6. Forgot to add that the slot is 140mm above the lowest point in the valley of the Aramax sheet - which is in effect a valley gutter catching only its own rainfall - if it ever reached the 140mm height - there would be problem - depending on the pitch of the roof? That also would be a lot of rain!

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  7. Both Kalzip and T-Seam slide along fixed position clips, there are no sliding or slotted expansion clips, this allows much longer lengths to be rolled than traditional standing seam profiles where the profile is firmly fastened to the clip.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. its a very catch 22 situation - too loose and its going to have a reduced serviceability and too tight and expansion becomes an issue - from the videos Roofer has provided Kalzip looks fantastic, especially the mechanically seemed edges - being Aluminum is the cost prohibitive? or does the shallower pan allow for greater coverage?

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  8. Just wondering if the original failure at WIN Stadium had anything to do with this expansion allowance - very hot days and then rain (hot / cold) when it occured????

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  9. WIN stadium was to do with the fitters using the wrong size bolts to fix the sheeting to the support structure, no fault on the part of product.

    All these questions regarding expansion could probably be answered by emailing Fielders/Aramax directly.

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  10. Longest Ziplok profile roll formed on site I know is 151.75m on the roof of Taiwan's Nangang Exhibition Hall.

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  11. Thanks for that.
    Looking like it may be a world record.

    Have you got anymore details of this?

    ReplyDelete